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20110301
20110331
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Book TV 59
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CSPAN2 59
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English 59
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2011 9:00am EST
. this view of america's islamist enemy is unfortunate endemic in both u.s. political parties, much of the u.s. and western media, and perhaps most damaging, much of the academy, especially and most prestigious universities. it is in my judgment that this is almost entirely without substantiation. and it continues to be washington's working assumption, america will slowly but surely be defeated with a loss of prestige, plot, financial solvency, and domestic political cohesion. we will lose not because any of these threats are stronger than we are. that certainly is not the case. america's myopic indeed can america's myopic coming elite and its media acolytes have taken enemies who are each in military capability, at most the puny five-foot tall, even sandals, and made them into 10-foot tall and still growing behemoths. the three threats i'm going to speak about are those posed by iran, saudi arabia and al qaeda and its allies. taking these three threats, each of which is based in the persian gulf, let us first look at the smallest least threatening threat, that which comes from iran. since our
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2011 10:00am EDT
foreign policy program for the region, highly dependent on the u.s. and western support. iran is qualitatively different. they have been politically independent. and is to give you an example of how the regime despite all of its failings, up until 2009i would argue that it still had a certain degree of legitimacy. that is reflected in the fact that in 2009 we had a phenomenal event or about 80-85 percent of the electorate shows up to the ballot box to cast a vote hoping this people who voted for the opposition, the they could change the course of the public, not drastically, but change back to the performance days. the fact that people were voting in high numbers suggests that they believe the electoral system had a certain degree of legitimacy. it could shift the direction which speaks to a certain degree of legitimacy. no wonder is this now because the 2009 elections were largely stolen, but up until 2009 you did have a certain degree of legitimacy as reflected in the high voter turnout. never been in evidence anywhere in egypt or tunisia to the same extent that we have seen
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 10:00pm EDT
: a people interrupted published in 2007. iran: the green movement in the u.s.a. the fox and the paradox published last year and available for this evening. the world is my home, a hamid dabashi reader also published last year. and just outcome is she is in, a religion of protest. her blond eyebrow man, distinguished professor of iranian and middle eastern politics at beirut college. his books include iran between two revolution, published in 1982 and widely referred to as the meanest real reference point. tortured confessions in public recantation in modern iran published in 1999 and most recently come a history of modern iran published in 2008. hamid dabashi teaches middle eastern studies at records and is a frequent contributor to a range of publications including tehran bureau. her current research interests include political arts and music in iran, women and gender and fundamentalist religious communities in north america and women's rights movements in iran and the global comparative context. nader hashemi teaches middle eastern islamic politics at the joseph corbo is too cool for
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2011 3:00pm EST
of massachusetts on his personal and professional life, including his election to the u.s. senate to fill the term of the late senator ted kennedy. at 8, richard whitmire examines former washington, d.c. school chance michelle rhee's efforts to reform the school system. on after words, rubin carter talks about the 20 years he spent in prison and his work for the innocence since his 1935 re-- 1985 release. we conclude with mr. west who served as assistant secretary of defense for international security affairs durgd reagan administration. he argues that a reliance on counterinsurgency strategies has led the u.s. astray in afghanistan. >> in this time we win, senior editorial writer robbins argues that the tet offense offensive was a failure for the vietnamese. from san diego, this is about an hour. >> thanks, t.j.. good morning, everybody. happy to be here. thanks for inviting me. i'm really delighted. i noted on your web site that it identified me as writing for "the washington post" and not the washington times. i'm not offended. maybe they are. [laughter] slight difference. just wanted to point
CSPAN
Mar 5, 2011 7:00pm EST
that detailed what was planned. the u.s. embassy a month before the attack gave a briefing in which they talked about what they thought was coming. if you go through january 1968 which was the month before the attack happened which took place right at the end of january, our forces went on progressively greater states of alert, our decision makers talked about the coming attack. there was a story three days before the attack in "the washington post" saying, talking about the expected spring offensive that was coming. and then, furthermore, the enemy when they finally launched their attack because of miscommunication, some of their guys attacked two days too early, some of the guys attacked the day before they were supposed to attack. the whole country of south vietnam was on alert. how do you get a surprise attack out of that? the point is that the press settled on a storyline. they decided since some of the people in washington were surprised, everybody must have been surprised. they asked the johnson administration if you knew about it in advance, why didn't you tell us? the johnson administr
CSPAN
Mar 5, 2011 10:00am EST
security dependence, dependent on its enemies by relying on the saudis to play april u.s. role in the oil market. and endangered our economy but allowing the saudis to buy an ever larger share of our ever more out of federal debt. in addition, the status quo the past 30 years have built a highly effective lobby and the united states, which is as pernicious, effective and corrupting asp ipad, but more quiet and subtle. this lobby employs former u.s. ambassadors, generals, and seniors, senior intelligence officers to argue its case in the white house, the congress, and the media. especially in "the wall street journal." and needless to say, this lobby's work is enthusiastically assisted by our oil and arms making corporations whose concerns have less to do with u.s. security and in making sure they keep their seats on the saudi gravy train. that is come even now hauling away another $60 billion worth of us-made arms. due to these factors, u.s. leaders never tell americans the truth about the conduct, which is that since the 1970s oil boom started an enormous transfer of western wealth to th
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2011 5:15pm EDT
's own internal. the second is the u.s. pakistani bilateral relationship, and the third is the rise in global jihad. what we think of here in america is al qaeda, but it's a much larger movement of the like-minded organizations who share the same goals, if not the shame leadership -- if not the same leadership. the history is fascinating. extraordinarily complex. at one level, there's a struggle between those who created pakistan, who had a vision of pakistan that was going to be a modern, democratic, largely secular state that would look a lot like england in the river valley. against him from the start, islamic extremist, who imposed pakistan because they wanted to control all of the subcontinent, and have now come around to waging war against india. then there's the struggle between the civilian government and the military. pakistan has a military which is seized power four times in some 60 years. one of those, general zealhoc deserves the title of the grandfather in the 1980s. he was our partner in the war against the soviet union. we'll come back to that. these various struggle
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2011 10:00pm EST
are saying and the strategy you are recommending now and both the line that was taken from the u.s. military in the early years in iraq and the strategy pursued in afghanistan between 2002 and 2006 when there were 30 or 45,000 special forces troops and a grand total of those 10 nikopol to destroy the taliban with heavy reliance on technology. it profoundly did not work and most analysts point* to insufficient population security as one of the reasons and the reliance on local warlords and intermediaries who used us to settle scores. how would that strategy recommending differ from the first place? >> three things. it has only been in the last year or two i have actually seen the maturation of the linkage between our air and ground if i have ever seen in combat second, not using local warlords we now have the entire afghan army. i say put that out in front the way it should be that we never had before. third, i don't believe the population protection and gets us anywhere. gradually you can have the afghans to a for themselves but we're just spinning our wheels during population protection we
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2011 4:00pm EST
by relying on the saudis to play a pro u.s. role in the oil market and in gingers the economy by allowing them to buy an ever larger share of our ever more out of control federal debt. in addition, the saudis over the past 30 years have built a highly effective lobby in the united states which is as pernicious, effective and corrupting as high tech but more quiet and subtle. the lobby employs former u.s. ambassadors, generals and seniors intelligence officers to argue the case in the white house, the congress and the media. and especially in the "wall street journal." and needless to say, the lobby's work is enthusiastically assisted by our oil and arms leading corporations whose concerns have less to do with the u.s. security than making sure they keep their seats on the saudi retrain that is even now hauling away another $60 billion worth of u.s.-made arms. due to these factors, the u.s. leaders never tell americans the truth about the kingdom, which is that since the 1970's oil boom started an enormous transfer of western wealth to the peninsula the saudis have quietly exported the bra
CSPAN
Mar 12, 2011 1:00pm EST
of recordkeeping that stretches back 108 years. this is another view from the u.s. drought monitor of 2002 showing drought conditions. we had big fires break out in 2002. it was the best known because it was 460 some odd acres, the biggest fire in arizona's history. it was two separate fires set by humans and they eventually merged. this is a color enhanced image from space, but just how big the fires how when you look at the landscape. this is one of the 400 houses destroyed. this is the entire map of arizona, and you can see the fire took out a big portion of the high country forests. i just want to talk just a minute about another big effect on our water supply. this is glen canyon dam and any aquatic species in the southwest was in difficult circumstances because of dams like this and all we do to modify the water systems here in the southwest. this is the hump back chub, one of many species in payroll. these two maps show you two different scenarios of what global warm can do to our water supply in terms of precipitation. there's going to be a dramatic decrease in precipitation, and we're tal
CSPAN
Mar 13, 2011 9:00am EDT
with each other. the first narrative is pakistan's own internal development, the second is the u.s./pakistani bilateral relationship, and the third is the rise of the global jihad. what we think of here in america as al-qaeda, but which is, in fact, a much larger movement of like-minded organizations who share the same goals if not the same leadership as al-qaeda. let me briefly turn to each. pakistan's internal history is a fascinating story, extraordinarily complex. at one level there is a struggle between those who created pakistan, muhammad jinnah who had a vision of pakistan as a modern, democratic, largely secular state that would look a lot like england in the indus river valley. against him from the start were islamic extremists who, in fact, originally opposed integration of pakistan because they wanted to control the whole subcontinent. then there's a struggle between the civilian government and the military. pakistan has a military which has seized power four times in some 60 years. one of those who seized power rightly deserves the title of the grandfather of the modern
CSPAN
Mar 12, 2011 2:00pm EST
ideas would be that in humid areas like the tropics and eastern u.s. we can hope -- things we can do to help flood protection. we are getting extreme floods and expected to get worse. sea level rise will increase floods. doing things for flood protection, puts in more wetlands tubes of floods. but that will be a good way to keep our cities, held the lead at to climate change and in humid areas, a really good idea because we know these have been on the job taking of greenhouse gases and carbon dioxide in particular and to help them do that job would be a great thing but of course that requires a lot of oversight. collaborative groups. that is an import the element. you need to get local people involved so you get a good divers species and not just some plantations said that is good for humid lands. we have a different situation because we are facing more drying in between possibly more extreme rainfall so in our cities what we need to do is plant trees in our cities to help cool our cities because not only do we have the climate change temperature rise also payment and buildings emitt
CSPAN
Mar 12, 2011 9:00pm EST
, the second is the u.s. pakistani bilateral relationship in the third is the rise of the global jihad. but a much more like mine did leadership but not the same goals as al qaeda. pakistan internal history is a fascinating story, extraordinarily complex. at one level there is a struggle those who created pakistan who had a vision of a pakistan that would be modern, democratic, largely secular state that would look a lot like the england. against him from the start was the islamic extremist that originally opposed pakistan because they've wanted to control all of that but wanted to come around to wage war against india. then there is the struggle between the civilian government and the military. pakistan has a military that seized power four times in 60 years. one of those rightly deserve to the grandfather in the 1980's. he was our partner with the war of the soviet union. i will come back to that. these various struggles interact constantly with the unpredictable mix. and with murders and assassinations with the first prime minister murdering in 1948 to benazir bhutto murdered only t
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2011 5:15pm EST
that that will be that final cost for the product. >> said the u.s. futures because they have too much risk, right? they want to shut it off onto some other people, and i think what makes it such a fun business is that chicago has all of these people not willing to take that risk. >> that's the other side. the real economic reason for having futures contracts for those who want to avoid risks but it certainly also provides a great opportunity for those who want to assume risk in search of process. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> how did the juvenile to list the system get started in this country? >> will it got started writer of the turn of the 20th century. the first juvenile court law was passed in illinois and 1899 establishing a separate court for juvenile, and along with it can separate institution for the juvenile centers. the system was so popular that it was copied by almost every a thirsty and the union by the 1920's. texas adopted a juvenile court in 1907. >> and you write that the juvenile justice system has failed in this country. why do you think that it's faile
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 2:45pm EDT
deported back to the united states even though i'm not a u.s. citizen. i wasn't able to go back for three years, and the journey of the book comes full circle in my most recent trip in the summer of 2010 and kind of looking at how things have changed. so it chronicles the six-year period and, ultimately, i like to think of it as a portal into gaza to help people understand israel's occupation policies, especially as it relates to the average person. and really it's like i was saying, a window into understanding the violated but resilient lives we live as palestinians. and can it's a story about mothering -- it's a story about mothering, homeland, identity, war and, ultimately, survival. so i encourage you all to take a look, and, you know, we can talk more in the question and answer. >> great, thank you. wow, first two stuck right to the seven-minute rule. [laughter] we have lots of time. josh? a high standard has been set. over to you. >> we'll see how well that works. um, so i wanted to open this up by kind of relating an analogy. so last week when he was testifying before congress, dav
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2011 9:00pm EDT
u.s. national-security to meet the threats of today. and believes it is essentials that we consider both the fiscal and the strategic implications of the defense programs. and it promotes informed oversight in the pentagon activities. the pentagon labyrinth is edited by the project director winslow wheeler are who is one of an extraordinary group of experts, pentagon insiders and retired military officers who collaborated on this work. the book is intended for both newcomers and also for seasoned observers to learn how to grapple with the significant problems of our national defense. for those who would like physical copies and who are not with us today, they are available on sale on amazon dhaka, and also barnes and noble bn.com. however, the complete essays of the work are of really valuable set of related reports and source materials are available and can be downloaded on-line at www.cdi.org. if you go to that site and find the image of the book and click it is a lifeline to and will get you right to all of the essays and related materials. we are extraordinarily grateful to thos
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 9:30am EDT
've gathered here tonight. the goal of the project is to transform u.s. national security to meet the missions and threats of today. and it believes that it's essential that we consider both the fiscal and the strategic implications of defense programs. and it promotes informed oversight of pentagon activities. the pentagon labyrinth is edited by the project's directer wheeler, who is one of an extraordinary group of experts pentagon insiders and retired military officers who collaborated on this work. the handbook is intended for both newcomers and also for seasoned observers to learn how to grapple with the significant problems of our national defense. for those who'd like physical copies and who aren't with us today, they are available on sale at amazon.com and also barnes & noble's bn.com. however, the complete essays of the work along with a really valuable set of related reports and source materials are available and can be downloaded online at www.cdi.org. and if you go to that site and find the image of th
CSPAN
Mar 13, 2011 8:00pm EDT
opportunity and in the case of the u.s. the ability to get around without a car for every adult. some of that is my research on and public transportation and the fact that many build a new subway stop party rates go up near the stock. does that make people pour? it is impoverishing the people? of course, not. those are attracting poor people who do not have a car for every adult who needs to get around. in the developing world come this city's provided more important party and ghandi talked about the importance of the future is in the villages. it is in the city's the way they connect with the outside world and it is unquestionably true that life is enormously difficult that none of us would want to live for a day little-known many years but there are still reasons why people come there. it still beats the end deprivation in brazil and beats living in a world where time seems to stand still and cities provide that promise. does not mean that they do not create challenges that they are close enough to exchange ideas we could affect each other and if we are close enough to sell you a ne
CSPAN
Mar 21, 2011 1:00am EDT
, was to kenya and to tanzania, and i was there 1998 after the u.s. bombings of the embassy -- the bombings of the u.s. embassies there. i ended there on a fluke. i read bout the bombings and whoever read my copy wrote about the fact that 12 americans had died, and i got off the set and read the story myself, and then i found out 214 africans died and 5,000 others were injured, and it was never mentioned. i had a built tantrum. i was known for those. there was nothing to it other than a way they didn't pay attention, and so talked about it, and a few couple weeks later, i met a -- i'm at the social event, saying how disstressed i am and a young black physician of the national medical association said i too am enramminged about this, but i'm doing something about it. i've been soliciting. i have $250,000 of medical supplies i'm going to take to africa, would you like to come along? boy, did i want to come along, but i thought i have about a snowball chance in haiti like this book. you're gipping to understand the -- beginning to understand the title. i'm a local reporter in san fransisco wan
CSPAN
Mar 7, 2011 7:00am EST
, and it's one of the most politically powerful states. several recent u.s. presidents have come from texas, several important national legislators have come from texas. >> what -- why did you want to write this book? what was the impetus to get you started? >> um, my impetus to get started on this book really was an interest in how we as a society decide who the good kids are and who the bad kids are and then what is to be done with them. and i initially began looking at popular churl and -- cultural and representation of youth, and be then i became dissatisfy with the that and decided i needed to look at real kids and real policies and institutions that effected them. >> so where does after all of your research, where do texas and other states go from here? have grow seen improvement -- have you seen improvement as you were writing the book? >> well, there's been a lot that's changed since i finished the book. as we sit here, the legislature is considering abolishing the agency that oversees juvenile justice in texas. several large facilities have been shut down as i was finishing the boo
CSPAN
Mar 12, 2011 8:00am EST
on counterinsurgency strategy has led the u.s. astray in afghanistan. >> what i'd like to do in about the next 20 minutes is give you an overview of two things relative to afghanistan, and the first is what is the nature of the war, and the second is what is the strategy, and why do i call it the wrong war? the nature of the war i base on i have about ten years, now, on battlefields in vietnam, iraq and afghanistan, and as barbara said, generals are okay and secretaries of defense and presidents may have roles, but they better keep their egos under control because tolstoy in his book "war and peace" really had it right. what actually happens in war has much more to do with the tenacity of those who are fighting than it does with the pronouncements from on high. and i'll try to show you why. i'd like to just bring you through very quickly what the war looks like, how the strategy's embedded in it and then turn it over for questions. of most of my time in afghanistan, i've been there -- i'm just about to go back for my tenth trip. i i probably have about 18 months altogether, ten trips in the last
CSPAN
Mar 12, 2011 3:00pm EST
leader, was really the military, the u.s. navy. i joined the u.s. navy in 1977 when i matriculated at the medical school in bethesda. my parents continue afford to send me, the only way to do it was a full scholarship, you just pay them back 12 years of your life, and i stayed on for 24 because it was that exciting. i learned a lot from the military. it really allowed me o become the person i am. and the things i really learned about was focusing on what the mission was about. what was our job, what was our mission, and that supersedes somebody's ego, supersedes whatever's going on. the other thing it taught me was respect for authority. and looking at my leaders and the people i served under, i was really fortunate to have wonderful role models and mentors who believed in me and guided me along and promoted me along the way. also taught me to be understanding and look out for my troops, the people who served with me and under me because you really, you're only as good as the people you work with and work as a team. i learned about camaraderie, but i also learned about not burning
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2011 12:00pm EDT
at the end of the war in which benjamin franklin was one of the key u.s. and initiators. over the course of many months the five peace negotiators are meeting in paris hashing out terms of the independence of the united states. lots and lots of sticking points, but their resolve all of them until they get to one last one in the fall of 1782. and the sticking point concerns whether the u.s. is going to be made responsible for giving compensation to loyalists his property has been confiscated during the war. most of the other american negotiators are okay, but benjamin franklin will not give in on this point. he says, if you grant compensation i'm not going to sign the treaty. we have to keep fighting the war. and it anticipates his later act of property related. the two rarely ever meet again. at think these family divides do matter, and i do think what i think about most is that getting into the personalities and into the individual experience is important for explaining how history has operated. >> he said that this is the first book about the loyalist exile, refugee what to you feel sh
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2011 11:00pm EDT
on solutions that our u.s. audience might not be interested in. you mentioned the housing crisis, and when i think of the housing crisis, it makes me very pessimistic. i read your book, and i like to think we basically have the government to the federal reserve with artificially low interest rates and government-rated entities, fannie and freddie tilting and liquidity flows into the housing. we have a bubble caused by government mistakes, and the answer in washington is more government. now, you have a history of being in the financial markets. you know that moral hazard is critical. you know mispricing and misallocation of risk is a very misguided approach. it seems when washington does something wrong it's the answer for washington to do something else wrong. two wrongs don't make a right, but it seems that's what government specializes in. >> guest: if the united states government had done nothing around the united states fiscal crisis, what this world and the country would have faced would have been much worse. i'm not a believer in big government. i know what it can do to an economy. lo
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 7:00pm EDT
negotiations of the end of the war and which benjamin franklin was one of the key u.s. negotiators and over the course of many months the five peace negotiators are meeting in paris and hashing out the terms of the independence of the united states and there are lots of sticking points along the way that there was until they get to the one of last one and the kind of fall of 1782i guess it is, and the sticking point concerns whether the u.s. is going to be made responsible for giving compensation to loyalist whose property is the confiscated during the war, and on this point most of the other american negotiators are okay with it adams and john jay that when gen franklin will not give in on this point and he says if you grant compensation i'm not going to sign the treaty. we have to keep on fighting the war. so if you want the reverse, you know, and it anticipates his own leader access of sort of property related vengeance. he writes william out of his will leader and the two rarely ever meet again. and i think they do better and what i think about most is getting into the personality and t
CSPAN
Mar 5, 2011 9:00am EST
? are they still talking about -- another question is some of the boys who went over to the u.s. to america were very young. they were as young as 6 or 10 years old. how did they find this adaptation to america? >> i will answer the first question briefly. they are very well known in china because many of them -- 120, a good 45 are tremendously impressive men. the prime minister, the engineer, the diplomat, the man who convinced britain to -- men of many accomplishments. as to your other question, how did they survive this strenuous journey to america? we are talking about new england in the nineteenth century. good old puritan tradition. you were sitting around the dinner table you need to know how to call what you eat in english. under that system of education your learn english very fast. >> by the time they got back to china, they were still quite young. they were 20 years google turtle 23 years old and could they make a difference in china? >> by the time they got to shine as a% to all these menial tasks. it took from ten years to come into their own as men. when they did, did they! they re
CSPAN
Mar 5, 2011 12:48pm EST
see today that china is the principal exporter and the u.s. is tremendous deficit and balance of trade. would you say china is a great follower of adam smith and the u.s. is a poor follower of adam smith? >> adam smith is certainly read in july. i live in the hope of getting a transit -- chinese translation of my book. i very much doubt whether the present government or the government of the last half generation in china has actually been sitting there with copies of the wealth of nations on the desk. i think the intellectual history of policy formation and respect of management and trade in china over the last 25 years is much more complicated than that. us suspect extremely interesting. i am no economist. it is a much more multifaceted and not necessarily exclusively pragmatic approach to the management of trade. that is from and economics amateur like myself. >> may i say something to that? i would suggest in the last 30 years or so, china has been surprise. chinese communist leadership has been surprised the extent to which adams smith's ideas work. areas in which smithian markets
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2011 12:00pm EST
of independence, and i know that is what you mean but there is no one picture of the u.s. in 1775, because there are so many different united states, if you will and it isn't the u.s. yet, they have the colonies and they have distinct cultures and economies. >> was there a similar political mood across all 13 colonies, in 1775? >> here we get to the issue, how could they ever act together? i think they could act together because they had the same political assumptions and political values and, they had a common enemy. there is nothing like an enemy to pull diverse elements together. and to the extent britain had begun to, first of all, to try to tax the colonies, although they weren't represented in parliament, and then, when the colonies resisted, followed with others, yes, they pulled together and understood the interest of any one colony was the interest of others, and if they could -- if britain could get by, for example, destroying the assembly of new york, because it had resisted a... refused to supply british troops, if they could do that in new york they could do that in any other
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2011 2:45pm EDT
. the wakefield report has led to a movement in the u.s. fueled by celebrities like oprah winfrey and jenny mccarthy to stop vaccinating children which is a troubling development. his focus on vaccinations has diverted money away from important autism research. he spoke at the university of wisconsin in madison for a little over an hour. >> i'm going to talk briefly about how the book came about and some themes that i try and deal with in the book. then i will leave as much time as i can for questions. i have spoken with a number of different types of groups, and it has been hard for me to anticipate what the questions are going to be outside of them always being provocative and interesting. so -- and i expect that will be even more true tonight at a university where people are coming at it from all sorts of different angles. as opposed to a nursing coalition or the center for inquiry or different places. so excuse me. i will also be sipping a lot. replenishing my liquids. so, this book, this project started for me about three years ago a little more than three years ago. and at the time i
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 1:00am EDT
areas in the u.s. produces the output but contains on the 13% of our population. the difference between prosperity is even stronger in the world. if you compare the countries with 50% of the population living in urban areas with less than 50% of population living in urban areas, the urban areas are five times richer and have mortality levels that are one-third as high. they describe themselves as being more satisfied with their lives and jobs, that cities are the pass of out of poverty into pros prosperity for so much of the world. of course, we've seen the success of places like new york. they are fun, green, healthy. they are exciting places to be where the magic of human interactions tends to make the place more exciting. now, the idea behind this book, the reason, the claim that the book makes for why cities have come back is that cities play to human kind's greatest asset, which is our ability to learn from people around us. we come out of the womb with a remarkable ability to learn from our parents, peers, siblings, people around us doing things that are smart and people around us
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 4:15pm EDT
was there at 1998 right after the bombing of the u.s. embassy there. and i landed there through fluke. i was sitting on the news desk copy about the bombing, and he would ever admit my copy, wrote about the fact that 12 americans had died. and i got off the set and start to read the story myself, and then i found out, 214 africans have died, and 5000 others had been injured and it was never mentioned. so i had a little belva davis tantrum. i was known for those of a race issue. there was nothing to accept the way so that they didn't just, you know, not pay attention. so talked about it, and a few, a couple of weeks later i met a social event and and say how distressed i am and a young black woman physician with the national medical association, you know, that's the black medical association, said i, too, am in raged about this but i'm doing something about it. i have been soliciting. i have about $250,000 with medical supplies i'm going to to come along? and boy, did i want to come along. but i thought i have about a snowball's chance in haitis like this book, you're beginning to understand the titl
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2011 8:00am EDT
york our national gdp would increase by 43%. the three largest metropolitan areas in the u.s. produced 18% of our country's output while containing only 13% of our country's population. the connection between urbanization and economic prosperity is even stronger in the developing world. if you compare those countries with more than 50% of the population living in urban areas with those that have less than 50% of the population living in urban areas you will find more urbanized countries are more than five times more prosperous, five times richer. they also have infant mortality levels that are one-third as i. they also the people who describe themselves as being more satisfied with their lives and their jobs. cities are the path out of poverty into prosperity for so much of the world. we've seen the success of places like new york not just in terms of their income. cities are fun, green, healthy. they are exciting places to be where the magic of human interaction tends to make a place so much more exciting. the idea behind this book, the reason, the claim the book makes for why cities
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2011 9:00am EDT
of this country, though, was to kenya and to tanzania. and i was there 1998 right after the bombing of the u.s. embassies there. and i landed there through a fluke. i'm sitting on the news desk reading copy about the bombings, and whoever had written my copy -- because it was a breaking story -- wrote about the fact that 12 americans had died. and i got off the set and started to read the story myself, and then i found out 214 africans had died and 5,000 others had been injured, and it was never mentioned. so i had a little belva tantrum. i was known for those over race issues. and there was nothing it except they didn't, you know, just not pay attention. so talked about it, and a few couple of weeks later i'm at a social event, and i'm saying how distressed i am, and a young black woman physician with the national medical association -- you know, that's the black medical association -- said i, too, am enraged about this, but i'm doing something about it. i've been soliciting. i have about $250,000 worth of medical supplies that i'm going to take to africa. would you like to come along? and, b
CSPAN
Mar 5, 2011 4:15pm EST
of the u.s. championship where he won all of his games without draws but it had never been done before. it has not been done since. it may never be done again. i was right there at his board during the entire time. i had an opportunity to study him and observe him and i talk about that in the book of course. are also defended body when he got into a big contretemps when he was forfeited against samuel reshevsky and went to bat for him in print. it turned out to be a lawsuit with fischer suing samuel reshevsky. because of my constant championing him i lost my job in chess life magazine which i had founded. so we bonded and i was in iceland with him for -- we match took two month. for three months i came early and left late. during the time he watched the championship. i also looked at this book, this biography through the eyes of a friend. i was his friend. we had a falling out -- filings out, whatever we had. we had arguments. there were times, many years when we didn't speak so that was -- i did feel he was a friend. we dined together, played chess together of course, he came to my ho
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2011 1:15am EST
is that some of the boys who went over to the u.s., to america, were really young. they were as young as 6 or 10 years old. how did they survive this whole adaptation to america? >> well, i'll answer the first question briefly. they are very well-known in china because first of all, out of the 120, a good 40-45 are tremendously impressive men. the engineer, the prime minister, one was a man who convinced britain to recede, but they are men of many accomplishments. to the other question, how did they survive this strenuous journey to america. we're talking about new england in the 19th century, good puritan tradition. you sat around the dinner table, you want to eat, you have to call what you want to eat in english, if you don't know bread, potatoes, and meat, you're not getting anything. other than that, they learned very fast. >> by the time they got back to china, they were still quite young, like 22 years old, and could they make a difference in china? >> well, by the time they got to china, they were young. they were sent, again, to have all these medial tasks. it took ten years to com
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2011 1:00pm EDT
, sudden life-threatening stress. we did our jobs despite a bit. >> in your view is a retired u.s. their is the airline industry secure in the united states? >> you mean in terms of our security from scratch? >> in any way. >> or financially? >> more of a threat in air traffic, et cetera you. >> i think we are working hard to manage all those press, both in terms of the safety of the fist time in air traffic control and also in terms of our security. there is always more to be done and we're always trying to find new ways to learn from our experiences and do better in the future. that is part of what i'm trying to do now is keep on being an advocate for the highest professional standards in my profession and the highest level of safety for professors. >> how are you doing that? >> is speaking out. these are things i've carried about my whole life. first officer jeffrey scott is also doing a. and in terms of trying to do our best to fix the system, we are not done yet. >> chelsley sullenberger, "highest duty" is the name of his book. >> thank you very much. good to be here.
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 5:15pm EDT
to talk about that at all? did you think about that -- the 270 pages >> it was partly my long years the u.s.a. today, where he would get lectures from the editors unmoving eyeballs. if you watch somebody reading this paper and this gift to the newspaper can you get to the point of the story where they are gone. when i am reading -- i understand what you're saying, but i was afraid of losing the eyeball. you know, they are cuter -- >> richard wrote about the advantage point of a strong leader, and in, which i absolutely agree is one of the key things that can make a turnaround either work or not. let me type this from a slightly different perspective. so in principle jordan first came in, i started hearing from my staff, that is really turning around. my first year was an absolute disaster. it was literally one of the most functional schools we had, church of the "washington post" calling it an academic sinkhole. i started hearing things early on but things are looking up, things were better. and in the first year i don't think i was actually able to visit the school. i thought after the fir
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 8:00pm EDT
europe. i think they were much more substantial in the u.s. in the terms of readership and whatnot, but it's the international times is the first paper in europe. they were some of the european papers part of the gorped ground press syndicate. if you were lucky now enough to score an interview, you could be reprinted in europe. there were a few of those papers. i don't write about them all that much other than a couple canadian papers that show up. well, thank you very much. >> [inaudible] [laughter] >> i only drink red wine usually, but i think i'm going to have beer tonight. i'm going out tonight with a couple old friends. you guys are welcome to come along if you want. thank you so much. i really appreciate it. thank you, thanks. [applause] [applause] >> for more information, visit the author's website, johnmcmillian.com. >> we're at the national press club talking about the kennedy detail. jairld brain was a former secret service agent. can you tell us what that was like? >> can you tell them what it was like to be a secret service agent. >> oh, it was pretechnology in those da
CSPAN
Mar 5, 2011 9:15pm EST
, some of the boys who went over to the u.s., to america, were very young. they were as young as six or seven years old. how did they survive this whole adaptation to america? >> well, i will answer the first question briefly. they are very well-known in china. first of all because many of them -- i would say out of the 120 a good 40 or 45 work immensely impressive man. again the prime minister, the engineer, the diplomat. one of them was the man who convinced written to sort of see tibet. bury our man of many come fishman's. as you are the question, how did they survive this really strenuous journey to america? we are talking about new england in the 19th century, sort of goodwill. ten tradition. you were sitting around the dinner table. you want to eat, you better know how you want to call what you want to read in english. if you don't know ray pettitte is an meet and meet you ain't getting them. that is an education that they learned english very fast. >> but they come back to china, they were still quite young. they were like 20 years, 23 years old and could they make a differen
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2011 10:15am EST
:30 p.m. eastern. the author will be discussing "the civil wars in u.s. labor" at busboys and poets here in washington d.c. in the his book, mr. early details the struggle within the labor movement and offers strategies for moving forward. simply go to booktv.org on tuesday at 6:30 p.m. eastern, click on the watch icon in the featured programs section of the page. ♪ >> coming up next, booktv presents after words, an hourlong program. best selling author susan jacoby tackles the myths of old age in her new book, "never say die." she claims that american culture attempts to delude the aging population into believing 90 is the new 50. she discusses growing older in america with aarp state news editor sylvia smith. ♪ >> host: susan jacoby, welcome. you're the author of the new book "never say die" with the subtitle "the myths of marketing of the new old age." so what is the myth of the new old age? >> guest: the myth is that we are all -- and by we, i really mean people who are not old now, the aging boomers, people who are in their 50 but our old age is going to be lived in a way that's
CSPAN
Mar 12, 2011 9:00am EST
to exchange u.s. debt for state that? >> guest: profoundly important. this went into effect. all of the unrest in the states was in part a response to the taxation of the 1780s where the states were trying to retire their revolutionary war debt by taxes on land, a multiple of what they had been before and the people were very rested but hamilton proposed a brilliant idea, that all the state debts would become a natural death. national debt. he would issue bondss on the united states. a 4% rather than 6%. and didn't have to pay the principal we believe. all you had to pay was the interest. you could do that on the revenue that was coming and on the imports plus some excise taxes and the unfortunate run on whiskey. if basically what he did was to relieve a component of their budget which was the majority what we were raising money for. when the state and loggerhead to pay off their revolutionary war debt they no longer had to impose these taxes and the country became much more peaceful. >> host: next call from john in dallas. >> i'm reading about the history of propaganda in america. stuart spea
CSPAN
Mar 12, 2011 12:00pm EST
. for 35 years i have been researching and writing about u.s. history especially social and cultural history. recently i have been helping develop the field of children's history of a more global scale. this is a history for which i am professionally known and recognized but my most recent book is as much about poland as it is the united states and while it is very much about my childhood in the united states it is also about the destruction of children and childhood. "inheriting the holocaust: a second generation memoir" is about how life became a particular kind of american historian. when i was a little girl not yet 3 years old, my mother began to tell me about her past. that is the origin of "inheriting the holocaust: a second generation memoir" which i wrote many years after she died because i had to keep her story alive. why would an american historian write a memoir like this? for me writing this memoir became an act of what i call recovery. reconnecting with a different past, a personal past that i turn into history. i tell people i was not ready to write it until i had suffi
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2011 1:45pm EDT
party u.s.a. he's also an excellent writer. he grew up in the first half of the century the central part of kansas. he suffered more than the first part of his day. he's the next. it's about the struggle, influence, he goes on to become a very serious poet and a very serious journalist. in barack obama's case, he/ father," he mentions his writerly wants to because i meet some journal entries and was in very bad poetry. i'm not going to deny that, but that is not a writer. now, once i was looking around to see what did obama writes in print? there was that much for a guy who wrote this classic greats acclaimed memoir. there wasn't much to see. what i did find was one paper -- an article he had written as a senior at columbia called breaking the war mentality. although thematically it's no sillier than the average paper written by columbia undergraduate. scientifically it's a disaster. it's another in total disaster. this might be excusable if, for instance, you before this they had found barack obama in an indonesian cave being raised by wolves, but to this point, you just spent the last
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2011 6:00pm EDT
, one u.s., u.c. davis, sacramento, and the other from the university of georgia. what about grades? >> they all were pretty good grades. these are smart people. the other ing they did, they tended to have mentors. they tended to, for example, bill kristol at harvard frrks harvey man's field shaped his thinking. >> still going at harvard. >> still going at harvard. somebody like clint bullock, his mentors are interesting. one was a city councilman in his new jersey town who was a lone republican, but not much of a republican. he use today say, when you vote for the donkey or the he will fapt, that's what youet. but was very much an embattled battler, if you will, of the democratic machine in the town. and he had a ver bad ending in which the machine leaked some material about his personal life that destroyed him. anyway, clint sought him out as a mentor. later o sought out clarence thomas as a mentor. claren thom thomas was a godfather -- >> at the eeoc. >> he would talk for hours about clarence thomas' background, starting a business. this shaped clint's politics. >> what about dav
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 7:00am EDT
but they were all throughout europe. i think they were more substantial in the u.s. in terms of readership and what not, but i think it's called the international times is the first paper in the europe. they were also, some of these european papers were part of that underground press syndicate. if you were lucky enough to score an interview with janis joplin, you could be reprint inside a paper in europe. i just don't write about them all that much except for a couple canadian papers show up. thank you very much. yeah. >> [inaudible] [laughter] >> i only drink red wine usually, but i think i'm going to have beer tonight. i think i'm going to go to a bar with a couple of my old friends, but you guys are welcome to come along if you want. thank you so much, i really appreciate it. thank you. [applause] [inaudible conversations] >> for more information visit the author's web site, john mcmillian.com. >> booktv has 48 hours of nonfiction authors and book programming every weekend on saturday from 8 a.m. to monday morning at 8 eastern. l to get the complete weekend schedule e-mailed to you ever
CSPAN
Mar 5, 2011 2:00pm EST
life and how depraved u.s. he wanted a better shot for people, people who were privileged. the catch was the only one at that for whites. he was for the homestead act. when reconstruction came and there was the time to get land reform, the republicans in congress wanted land reform and the south to give the former and salespeople to give them land, to give them the kind of independence that johnson and others understood it. you can grow your own food, and you're not beholden to anyone. he wanted that for whites, but he didn't want for blacks. the populace part was there with the racist part of it that inhibited his thoughts about how this may be expanded to include everybody in america. he thinks of themselves as a champion of the common man. ps i said is for the union. he has no trouble whatsoever with secessionists. so he alienated even before the war he alienated people at jefferson davis because that support for the homestead. the southern grandees, planters did not like the idea of giving poor white people and. they wouldn't have used the term, but they thought this is like welf
CSPAN
Mar 5, 2011 8:00pm EST
i think. the effect in the u.s. is more diffuse because the u.k. for a number of different reasons doesn't have mandatory school age vaccination laws so it's much easier for something like this to see an immediate drop. what you've seen here is over the past 10 years, and i don't know now exactly the number of states, but it's somewhere between 70%-90% of states have now passed what is called the philosophical exemption law relating to vaccination meaning that in order to have your child go to a public school and not be vaccinated, you used to need a religious exemption, so, you know, a christian scientist could get a religious exemption. i could not go in as a reformed jew and say, oh, it's against my religion to get vaccinated, but now with a philosophical seemings, excuse me, all you need to do is say i don't believe in vaccines, and then you can go to school. your children can go to school without being vaccinated, and so there are now pockets around the country where there are communities with incredibly low vaccination rates, 60%-70%, which is much, much lower than needed to
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